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Walpurgis the day after

Walpurgisnacht

01 May Walpurgis the day after

Bible quote from Book Exodus 22:18  “Don’t allow a female sorcerer to live.”

Most legends and history intertwine and are inclusive of many items woven into a subject. As already said in previous post yesterday (http://the.maier-files.com/have-a-nice-walpurgisnacht/), Walpurgis has many legends and stories very few which are true and have cost many innocent people their lives. If your garden or farm prospered better than your neighbors, if you had any form of physical deformity, you were old, ugly, particularly beautiful, etc. you could be in great peril.

Alder trees are called Walpurgis trees as the Teutonic witches allegedly consumed the alder buds during their flight to the Brocken on Walpurgis. It is uncertain if the buds were eaten raw or cooked, and if cooked if they were seasoned and if so with which spices? Alder branches were used to stir the cauldron. Alder was sacred to the goddess Freya whose last remaining temple in Magdenburg, was destroyed by edict of Charlemagne. Poor Freya was banished to the mountain tops of Sweden, Germany and Norway. Though she was banished she continued to have her devotees and as late as 1688 the Saxons of Magdenburg continued their devotion to her even though she had been branded the queen of the witches by the church. Many Alder trees were uprooted and burnt to keep witches from using them to stir their cauldrons or make brooms. Brocken is not to be confused with Blokula-Blakella that Swedish witches fly off to at Easter as Brocken is real and the mountain Blokula has never been found if it existed at all except in tales. It is interesting to note that people still went to Brocken during the Burning Years when millions of women and some men were tortured, burnt, hung etc. for the crime of witchcraft.

Brocken mountaintop is an intriguing place.

 

A meteorological phenomenon known as the Brockengespenst can be observed near the mountaintop. Brockengespenst (Brocken ghost or spook) is an optical illusion, the anti-corona which causes a person’s shadow to loom magnified over the ridge which leads one to speculate if a spirit or ghost walks beside you. If that wasn’t eerie enough, often rainbow like bands and rings would surround the shadow.

Walpurgis is also the beginning of the Month of May.

Month of May has a very ancient root of importance linked to female deities and the mighty Disir of Teutonic Tribes. During the era when Walther von der Vogelweide, Wolfram von Eschenbach and numerous other minstrels, were exalting Love, the month of May, the Grail and the Rose Garden, or even the Mountain of Venus and the mountain of Holda in their poems, the people preferred these songs far over those in Latin of the Church or of the legends of the saints. When reading the Rosegarden mysteries and the Tyrolean legends, this theme of the fiancé of the month of May always returns.  As in the story once told about a knight in the mould of Dietrich of Bern who was riding on the very old Troj de rèses, the footpath of Tyrolean roses. He was trying in vain to find an access to Laurin’s kingdom. Then he asked an elf: “I wish to enter King Laurin’s rose garden, as I seek the fiancé of the month of May!”  “Into the rose garden come only the child and the poet,” answered the elf. ” If you can sing a beautiful ballad, then the way will be open to you.” So the knight sings Love and the month of May. And the paradise of roses opens up before him. For always. The knight entered into eternity. The month of May has indeed plenty veiled layers too.

 

 

 

Walpurgisnacht

Hope you enjoyed Walpurgisnacht as much as we did!

 

 

 

 

 



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Walpurgisnacht
Have a nice Walpurgisnacht

The time has come tonight ... WALPURGISNACHT! In the last days of paganism in Germany, the druids’ sacrifices were subject...

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