The Maier Files | Bella-in-a-tree, a ritualistic murder
It was in April 1943, when four boys searching for birds nests in Hagley Wood in arwickshire, England, found the skeletal remains in an old hollowed out elm tree. The police were called and it was established that the bones were the remains of a woman aged about thirty.
witchcraft, ritual, murder, occult, rite, elm, Hagley Wood Bella, hexe,
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Bella-in-a-tree, a ritualistic murder

Bella ritualistic murder

02 Apr Bella-in-a-tree, a ritualistic murder

It was in April 1943, when four boys searching for birds nests in Hagley Wood in arwickshire, England, found the skeletal remains in an old hollowed out elm tree. The police were called and it was established that the bones were the remains of a woman aged about thirty. Scraps of rotted clothing, a pair of shoes and a cheap wedding ring were also found. At first it seemed as if the skeleton was complete, but on further investigation the right hand was missing. It was later found some yards away from the tree. From forensic evidence and a witness who came forward saying he had heard screams in the wood at the time, it was believed that the remains had been placed in the tree about two years before in 1941 or 1940 …

About eight months after the grisly find graffiti began appearing on walls and monuments in Birmingham saying: ‘Who put Bella down in the wych-elm?’ and ‘Hagley Wood Bella’. Sometimes her name was spelt ‘Luebella’. Normally no notice would have been taken of such public scribblings except that Bella was an unusual and foreign sounding name. Writer Donald McCormick came across the ‘Bella-in-a-tree’ case when investigating the gory ritualistic murder in 1945 of an elderly farm labourer called Charles Walton in the village of Lower Quinton, also in Warwickshire. There were also rumours that Crowley and some of his disciples from Cornwall and the Midlands were involved in the killing.

The writer/journalist McCormack however suggested that both murders were connected with a revival of witchcraft before the war in the West Midlands and Cotswolds. Allegedly an ‘Hungarian astrologer’ working for British Intelligence was involved in setting up several new covens in the area. As McCormick had worked for the SIS and later wrote a history of the British Secret Service under the nom-de-plume ‘Richard Deacon’ he may have had some inside knowledge to support this claim. McCormick says the pre-war traditional witch covens established in the Cotswolds were authentic (which suggest genuine people were involved) but were part of an intelligence operation to catch German spies. He claimed that agents of the Third Reich had been parachuted into the Midlands from occupied Holland in 1941 and MI5 had uncovered the plot.

Bella ritualistic murder

 



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