paradox
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paradox

Nineteenth century British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli commented that the world is governed by very different people from what is imagined by those who are not behind the scenes. Dr. Carroll Quigley who taught at Harvard and Princeton and at the Foreign Service School of Georgetown University wrote about this network of "insiders" who govern from behind the scenes in...

Heretic Middle English: from Old French heretique, via ecclesiastical Latin from Greek hairetikos ‘able to choose’ (in ecclesiastical Greek, ‘heretical’), from haireomai ‘choose’. [vc_separator type='transparent' position='center' color='' thickness='' up='' down=''] In the Encyclopaedia Britannica one can read: "The word heresy is derived from the Greek hairesis which originally meant an act of choosing, and so came to signify a set of philosophical opinions or...

When it is exclaimed that contradictions may very well be true, numerous analytic philosophers will screw up their face into an appearance of discomfort, and say ‘But I just don’t see what it could be for a contradiction to be true’. They could mean numerous things by this. ‘See’ might just mean ‘understand’, by which case they might be complaining...

Paradoxes appear in all shapes and forms. Certain are uncomplicated paradoxes of reasoning with minimal potential for investigation, while others sit atop icebergs of full scale scientific disciplines. Many may be solved by mindful consideration of their hidden assumptions, one or more of them could be faulty. These, strictly stating, really should not be referred to as paradoxes at all,...

Do you know what time it is? That question may perhaps be asked a lot more these days than ever. In our clock-studded modern society, the answer is only a peek away, therefore we are able to "blissfully" partition our days into ever smaller sized increments for ever more neatly scheduled jobs, assured that we will always know it really...

Bernays applied the techniques he had learned in the CPI and, incorporating some of the ideas of Walter Lipmann, became an outspoken proponent of propaganda as a tool for democratic and corporate manipulation of the population. His 1928 bombshell Propaganda lays out his eerily prescient vision for using propaganda to regiment the collective mind in a variety of areas, including...

It is from the writings of one of the great magi of the Renaissance, Trithemius, that we learn the strange story of the Holy Vehm, the Secret Tribunal of Free Judges, founded by Charlemagne in 770. Secret ciphers and signs excludes the uninitiated. Trithemius was the abbot of Sponheim. Those initiates sometimes known as the secret Soldiers of Light.  Those...

Ask people about mathematics and they will talk about arithmetic, geometry, or statistics, about mathematical techniques or theorems they have learned. They may talk about the logical structure of mathematics, the nature of mathematical arguments. They may be impressed with the precision of mathematics, the way in which things in mathematics are either right or wrong. They may even feel...

The attentive reader of the first episodes of Maier files will have noticed that the tale once told by Rolf Dietrich and the history of Otto Maier are filled with powerful themes and images that might provide a clue to the real hidden mystery, among them: the Rose Trail (Troj de Reses), web of woven silk, the knights in the...