The Maier Files | Frigg
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Frigg

Frigg

Except for Hel, Frigg was the most widely known of the early Germanic goddesses. Her name appears in many tales as chief among the goddesses, it was her name that was used for sole feminine weekday as a translation for “Venus”, from which we get the modern “friday”. Frigg’s own dwelling-place is called Fensalir. She carried the keys, supervised the work and made trades, in short; she runned the business. Rod Landreth pictured her as the “CEO of Asgard”. Frigg’s magic is that of spinning and weaving. We also encounter her in the role of Balder’s mother. As the ideal of Norse motherhood: the wise woman who does all that is possible to ward and guide her grown son from danger. This maternal role is emphasized strongly in the sagas by women who are characterized as “witches”. German folklore does not mention Frigg, but names Perchte/Berchte and Holda (the Gracious One). Like Frigg they have watery homes. The German folklore may also cast some light on sides of Frigg, most particularly, her place in the Wild Hunt. In the early tales the Hunt is not only led by Wodan or Wod, but by Holda, Perchte and Frau Gode. So we may also see Frigg as Wodan’s female counterpart in all the wild rites of the Yule season, when all the year’s spinning is done. 😉