Strange connections Müller and Amber
Helgoland, Amber, Amberroutes, Maier files
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Strange connections Müller and Amber

Helgoland and Amber

Strange connections Müller and Amber

 

 

There’s a strange connection with Amber and the Amber routes. An ancient postcard showed up with a signature of Müller. Heligoland, the holy land (heliges Land) which was once called Abalus and Balcia. Old songs recount that the god Balder laid at rest here.  The Greek historian Diodorus knew that Heligoland was to be found “in the ocean, a continentcrossing journey away”, and he noted on this subject: “The waves of the sea hurl abundant quantities of elektron (the name given to amber by the ancient Greeks) onto this island, which one finds nowhere else on this earth. The elektron is gathered on this island and brought to the inhabitants of the continent opposite. From there, it is transported to our regions”. In the first century of this era, the Roman Pliny claimed in his Natural History, that the inhabitants of the island of Abalus used elektron in the place of wood to make fire and that they sold it to the Teutons, their closest neighbours; amber was thought to be a “product of the coagulated sea” (it must almost certainly have evoked marshy lagoons) and Pytheas of Marseilles is thought to have visited the island of Abalus! Abalus is Heligoland.  In following the ancient amber routes, this product of the North Sea travelled towards the South: as far as Egypt, where it had already been known in the third millennium before the Christian Era, and as far as Greece. Whoever followed this route, would cross the Black Forest, Odenwald — where Siegfried was assassinated —, Feldberg in Taunus — where one can see the stone bed of Valkyrie Brünnehilde —, Wetterau and Vogelsberg in High Hesse, Westerwald, Siegerland and Rothaargebirge (the Rothaar mounts).  All these routes cross the Hercynian Forest (Black Forest) and fuse with the roads of Hel (Helwegen) in northern Germany. Then they reach the Friesian sea, the North Sea. They end opposite the island of Heligoland.
Then it arrived — with other products originating in the North, such as bearskins and honey —, in the heart of the sacred oaks of the Dodone, the most important sanctuary  in Greece. Then it was dispatched to other Hellenic sanctuaries.  It was with full knowledge of the facts that the Argonauts, these Greek Vikings, had placed a beam cut from the wood of the Dodone oak at the prow of their ship Argo, so as not to be deprived of their god. During the course of their expedition, they passed near by to Heligoland: Apollonois of Rhodes, a Greek poet of the third century before the Christian Era, recounted in his Argonauticals that Jason and his companions, on their return from the land of the Golden Fleece, reached the Eridanos, the Nordic river of amber!  As Otto Rahn also wrote, Amber is indeed a stone of a very particular nature!