The secret to regain lost paradise
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The secret to regain lost paradise

Bring me a Rose

The secret to regain lost paradise

There is a marvellous Tyrolean legend. The fiancée of a prince brings the “rose of memory” to the land of her betrothed. When questioned as to the nature of this rose, the young fiancée replies that it symbolises the memory of the days when there was neither hate nor murder, when all was beautiful and good. Centuries passed. With time, this unique rose gave rise to an immense garden, covering the mountain and flooding the whole country with crimson. Laurin is the king of this rose garden. He was this fiancé whose betrothed of the month of May had brought the rose of memory. Finally, he was forced to forbid men access to his rose kingdom. One day, children whilst playing found a mysterious key and thus entered into the garden. This key, was a Dietrich, a master key, was it not? Memory is Minne and is Love as all Minnesingers know … Reviving the old ways, restoring the ancient memories, singing about the Lady month is the way to regain the lost paradise.  In former times, when men were better, the king of the dwarves, Laurin, kept a splendid rose garden. An exquisite fragrance exuded from the calyces of the myriad of flowers and the music of innumerable birds would sing, night and day. But vile men succeeded in carrying off the king of the dwarves and led him, bound from head to foot, to their town where they forced him to perform tricks and play the buffoon. However, after a short while, Laurin managed discretely to rid himself of his bonds and, free, returned to his paradisiacal gardens. So that no unworthy person might find the entrance, he surrounded it — as he had already done once before — with a silk thread. A man’s arms would never be strong enough to break this thread, as fine as that of a spider’s web. All the money in the world would not be enough to buy the right to contemplate the rose garden. And even were a man to read everything, he would never find a book in which Laurin’s enchanted land was described. Maybe Laurin’s greatest marvel is his understanding of day and night, which is also that of life and death. Oh, how we would like to possess that knowledge! It is in these terms that men lament, but they need not. As one can always ascend to Laurin’s marvellous kingdom. In spite of the silk threads which protect it. Still, one must be a knight… or a child… or a poet!

Bring me a Rose