The Maier Files | Vehmic courts
16801
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-16801,single-format-standard,ajax_updown_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-theme-ver-17.1,qode-theme-bridge,disabled_footer_bottom,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.5.5,vc_responsive

Vehmic courts

Vehmic Courts

Vehmic courts

Vehmic Courts

 

Germany has seen the rise and fall of numerous secret orders and has harbored or encouraged the development of them more than most European nations. Though this doesn’t mean they are more powerful, from the Rosicrucians to the Order to the Golden Dawn, from the Freemasons to the beginning of the Nazi Party, Germany has had its fair share of intrigue.  The Catholic Church and even the built up Nazi Party later on, had attempted, in vain, to stamp them out.  Yet, the fire created  by the strategies of secret societies is hard to extinguish. No sooner has it been stamped out in one spot than it begins up again in another, similar to a woods fire that refuses to die. One secret society with such an unquenchable fire was die Heilige Vehme, the Holy Vehm. This remarkable society had, for a considerable length of time, brought fear to the German people, both the powerful and the weak. It was open in its objective—revolution—and its Vigilante justice was such that the name of the Holy Vehm was known over the world. In spite of the fact that they were accepted to have vanished toward the end of the sixteenth century, their image of a red cross on a white foundation survives til today in the International Committee of the Red Cross, and their vanishing appears to have happened at the same time as the appearance of the Rosicrucians (rosy or red cross). Members even considered themselves to be “knowers” and outsiders  were known as those “who had not seen the light.” In the old acts, still held at Dortmund, the members of these tribunals were regularly assigned under the name of Rose-Croix; there were three degrees of initiation: 1. the Francs-juges (The judges of the secret court), 2. the genuine judges who executed the sentences of the first in place, and 3. the Saintsjuges of the Secret Tribunal, whose obligation it was to watch, to scour the nation, and report on what went on. They had signs and words for acknowledgment. In 1371, after the Peace of Westphalia, they were strengthened by some of the wandering and banished Templars. Clavel mentions in his “l’Histoire Pittoresque de la Franc-maconnerie et des Societes Secretes” in 1843 that they set up themselves all through eastern Germany …